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So remember that time Tori and I posted our first TWTT? Well, we’re back in action! Katherine, Julia and I wanted to share a few quick photos we snapped at our team picnic from yesterday. Some weeks we may have a fun craft, recipe or adventure to share so you can all keep up with us in our personal lives in between the brilliant sessions and weddings we will be posting! I am so excited about these two girls and the stories their hearts have to share. It was so fun meeting at Longs Park, collaborating a fun little meal, talking about photography/the business and just chatting about life and what’s going on for all of us. I’m also so glad the weather is deciding to take a break from the rain and give us some nice sunshine!

Enjoy our little picnic while I head back to editing for the day!

Meagan Nicole

 photo blog001-33.jpg photo blog002-32.jpg photo blog003-29.jpg photo blog004-27.jpg

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Credit. IStock Share Fast Facts New @HopkinsMedicine study finds African-American women with common form of hair loss at increased risk of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet New study in @JAMADerm shows most common form of alopecia (hair loss) in African-American women associated with higher risks of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids.In a report on the research, published in the December 27 issue of JAMA Dermatology, the researchers call on physicians who treat women with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) to make patients aware that they may be at increased risk for fibroids and should be screened for the condition, particularly if they have symptoms such as heavy bleeding and pain. CCCA predominantly affects black women and is the most common form of permanent alopecia in this population. The excess scar tissue that forms as a result of this type of hair loss may also explain the higher risk for uterine fibroids, which are characterized by fibrous growths in the lining of the womb.

Crystal Aguh, M.D., assistant professor of dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says the scarring associated with CCCA is similar to the scarring associated with excess fibrous tissue elsewhere in the body, a situation that may explain why women with this type of hair loss are at a higher risk for fibroids.People of African descent, she notes, are more prone to develop other disorders of abnormal scarring, termed fibroproliferative disorders, such as keloids (a type of raised scar after trauma), scleroderma (an autoimmune disorder marked by thickening of the skin as well as internal organs), some types of lupus and clogged arteries. During a four-year period from 2013-2017, the researchers analyzed patient data from the Johns Hopkins electronic medical record system (Epic) of 487,104 black women ages 18 and over. The prevalence of those with fibroids was compared in patients with and without CCCA. Overall, the researchers found that 13.9 percent of women with CCCA also had a history of uterine fibroids compared to only 3.3 percent of black women without the condition.

In absolute numbers, out of the 486,000 women who were reviewed, 16,212 had fibroids.Within that population, 447 had CCCA, of which 62 had fibroids. The findings translate to a fivefold increased risk of uterine fibroids in women with CCCA, compared to age, sex and race matched controls. Aguh cautions that their study does not suggest any cause and effect relationship, or prove a common cause for both conditions. €œThe cause of the link between the two conditions remains unclear,” she says.

However, the association was strong enough, she adds, to recommend that physicians and patients be made aware of it. Women with this type of scarring alopecia should be screened not only for fibroids, but also for other disorders associated with excess fibrous tissue, Aguh says. An estimated 70 percent of white women and between 80 and 90 percent of African-American women will develop fibroids by age 50, according to the NIH, and while CCCA is likely underdiagnosed, some estimates report a prevalence of rates as high as 17 percent of black women having this condition. The other authors on this paper were Ginette A.

Okoye, M.D. Of Johns Hopkins and Yemisi Dina of Meharry Medical College.Credit. The New England Journal of Medicine Share Fast Facts This study clears up how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types. - Click to Tweet The number of mutations in a tumor’s DNA is a good predictor of whether it will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.

- Click to Tweet The “mutational burden,” or the number of mutations present in a tumor’s DNA, is a good predictor of whether that cancer type will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers shows. The finding, published in the Dec. 21 New England Journal of Medicine, could be used to guide future clinical trials for these drugs. Checkpoint inhibitors are a relatively new class of drug that helps the immune system recognize cancer by interfering with mechanisms cancer cells use to hide from immune cells.

As a result, the drugs cause the immune system to fight cancer in the same way that it would fight an . These medicines have had remarkable success in treating some types of cancers that historically have had poor prognoses, such as advanced melanoma and lung cancer. However, these therapies have had little effect on other deadly cancer types, such as pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma. The mutational burden of certain tumor types has previously been proposed as an explanation for why certain cancers respond better than others to immune checkpoint inhibitors says study leader Mark Yarchoan, M.D., chief medical oncology fellow.

Work by Dung Le, M.D., associate professor of oncology, and other researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Cancer Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy showed that colon cancers that carry a high number of mutations are more likely to respond to checkpoint inhibitors than those that have fewer mutations. However, exactly how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types was unclear. To investigate this question, Yarchoan and colleagues Alexander Hopkins, Ph.D., research fellow, and Elizabeth Jaffee, M.D., co-director of the Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care and associate director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute, combed the medical literature for the results of clinical trials using checkpoint inhibitors on various different types of cancer. They combined these findings with data on the mutational burden of thousands of tumor samples from patients with different tumor types.

Analyzing 27 different cancer types for which both pieces of information were available, the researchers found a strong correlation. The higher a cancer type’s mutational burden tends to be, the more likely it is to respond to checkpoint inhibitors. More than half of the differences in how well cancers responded to immune checkpoint inhibitors could be explained by the mutational burden of that cancer. €œThe idea that a tumor type with more mutations might be easier to treat than one with fewer sounds a little counterintuitive.

It’s one of those things that doesn’t sound right when you hear it,” says Hopkins. €œBut with immunotherapy, the more mutations you have, the more chances the immune system has to recognize the tumor.” Although this finding held true for the vast majority of cancer types they studied, there were some outliers in their analysis, says Yarchoan. For example, Merkel cell cancer, a rare and highly aggressive skin cancer, tends to have a moderate number of mutations yet responds extremely well to checkpoint inhibitors. However, he explains, this cancer type is often caused by a amoxil, which seems to encourage a strong immune response despite the cancer’s lower mutational burden.

In contrast, the most common type of colorectal cancer has moderate mutational burden, yet responds poorly to checkpoint inhibitors for reasons that are still unclear. Yarchoan notes that these findings could help guide clinical trials to test checkpoint inhibitors on cancer types for which these drugs haven’t yet been tried. Future studies might also focus on finding ways to prompt cancers with low mutational burdens to behave like those with higher mutational burdens so that they will respond better to these therapies. He and his colleagues plan to extend this line of research by investigating whether mutational burden might be a good predictor of whether cancers in individual patients might respond well to this class of immunotherapy drugs.

€œThe end goal is precision medicine—moving beyond what’s true for big groups of patients to see whether we can use this information to help any given patient,” he says. Yarchoan receives funding from the Norman &. Ruth Rales Foundation and the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Through a licensing agreement with Aduro Biotech, Jaffee has the potential to receive royalties in the future..

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€œVictorian residents are not permitted into NSW at all unless they are needed for specific purposes and even then have to apply for and get a permit. €œWe are constantly reviewing the situation in Victoria and will adjust the health orders as necessary to protect the people of NSW.” Anyone who flies into NSW from Victoria must either be a NSW resident or have a relevant permit that allows entry into NSW – that can include:defence officialsdoctors and nursescritical workers in energy, mining and constructionchild protection workersdisability workers.All how can i buy amoxil travellers are provided with a pack of two masks and hand sanitiser by the airlines. Upon arrival into NSW all passengers from Victoria are.

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Recommended they be collected in a private car by family or friendsnot to use public transport to get hometo only sit in the back seat of a car with the windows open and air conditioning not on recirculationtold to wear their face masks and observe hand hygiene recommendations, andcalled to make sure they arrive home.NSW Health is provided the contact details how can i buy amoxil of everyone who enters NSW from Victoria. NSW Police is conducting regular compliance checks for people told to go into ‘Home Isolation’ as well as responding to reports from the community in relation to suspected breaches. Over the weekend, NSW Police visited almost 600 homes to check that those that were meant to be self-isolating were how can i buy amoxil doing so.

In addition to that, over the same period NSW Police received 374 calls to Crime Stoppers reporting suspected breaches of the health orders, the majority of which were for people suspected of not following self-isolation rules. ​Seven cutting-edge NSW research projects have been awarded almost $15 million in NSW Government grants to improve the health of people with spinal cord injuries (SCI).Treasurer Dominic Perrottet and Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard today announced the grants at the http://www.segpa-col-dolto-reichshoffen.ac-strasbourg.fr/jeux/geographie/la-carte-de-france/ opening of the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) Spinal Cord Injury Research Centre at Randwick where three of the projects will be carried out. €œThe investment of how can i buy amoxil close to $15 million over four years was a centrepiece of our last Budget and it’s exciting to see the range of research projects now underway,” Mr Perrottet said.

€œThis is about improving the health and wellbeing of people with spinal cord injuries, and these projects could help people not just in NSW but right around the world.” Minister Hazzard said every one of the innovative projects holds tremendous promise to improve treatment for people living with spinal cord injuries, giving back muscle function, sense of touch and other abilities that most of us take for granted. €œA spinal how can i buy amoxil injury brings very substantial life challenges, but advances in research now mean survivors can have a better quality of life – and even the hope of a cure,” Mr Hazzard said. €œThese projects have great scope, from investigating ways to restore touch sensation through immersive virtual reality through to using electrical stimulation to improve breathing for people affected by the most severe form of paralysis.” The following grant recipients will conduct their research at the new NeuRA centre.

Associate Professor Sylvia Gustin, The University of NSW, Neuroscience Research Australia – received $2.5 million for her research project on using virtual reality training to restore how can i buy amoxil touch sensation. Professor Jane Butler – Neuroscience Research Australia, The University of NSW, received $1.5 million to develop a treatment to restore voluntary function after spinal cord injury. And Dr Euan McCaughey, Neuroscience Research Australia, The University of NSW, received $2.4 million for his research into using muscle stimulation to improve respiratory function for people with tetraplegia.

The projects have been awarded how can i buy amoxil through the NSW Government’s Spinal Cord Injury Research Grants program, launched in November 2019, with guidance from an advisory committee of spinal cord injury experts. NeuRA CEO, Professor Peter Schofield, said the range and scope of the funded research projects held exciting promise for health related outcomes. €œNeuroscience Research Australia is how can i buy amoxil at the forefront of spinal cord injury research in Australia.

Our new Spinal Cord Injury Research Centre and these research projects will dramatically improve Australia’s understanding of how to best treat people with these life-long injuries,” Professor Schofield said. €œNeuRA thanks the NSW Government for funding the Spinal Cord Injury Research Grants Program, and SpinalCure Australia for its tireless efforts in campaigning for more research funding to improve the quality of life for people with a spinal cord injury.” Information on grant recipients and their research projects is available on the OHMR Funded Research Directory​​.​​​.

A strict where can you buy amoxil permit system is in place for all flights arriving in NSW from Victoria and passengers undergo comprehensive police can you buy amoxil online and health checks upon arrival. Health Minister Brad Hazzard said all flights are met by NSW Health staff and police officers to ensure anyone entering NSW complies with the current health orders. “There are only limited reasons anyone from Victoria should be entering NSW and people have been turned back can you buy amoxil online despite being allowed on the plane in Melbourne,” Mr Hazzard said. €œVictorian residents are not permitted into NSW at all unless they are needed for specific purposes and even then have to apply for and get a permit.

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Strict instructions and rules are in place for those going into ‘Home Isolation’ including. Recommended they be collected in a private car by family can you buy amoxil online or friendsnot to use public transport to get hometo only sit in the back seat of a car with the windows open and air conditioning not on recirculationtold to wear their face masks and observe hand hygiene recommendations, andcalled to make sure they arrive home.NSW Health is provided the contact details of everyone who enters NSW from Victoria. NSW Police is conducting regular compliance checks for people told to go into ‘Home Isolation’ as well as responding to reports from the community in relation to suspected breaches. Over can you buy amoxil online the weekend, NSW Police visited almost 600 homes to check that those that were meant to be self-isolating were doing so.

In addition to that, over the same period NSW Police received 374 calls to Crime Stoppers reporting suspected breaches of the health orders, the majority of which were for people suspected of not following self-isolation rules. ​Seven cutting-edge NSW research projects have been awarded almost $15 million in NSW Government grants to improve the health of people with spinal cord injuries (SCI).Treasurer Dominic how can i buy amoxil Perrottet and Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard today announced the grants at the opening of the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) Spinal Cord Injury Research Centre at Randwick where three of the projects will be carried out. €œThe investment of close to $15 million over four years was a centrepiece of can you buy amoxil online our last Budget and it’s exciting to see the range of research projects now underway,” Mr Perrottet said. €œThis is about improving the health and wellbeing of people with spinal cord injuries, and these projects could help people not just in NSW but right around the world.” Minister Hazzard said every one of the innovative projects holds tremendous promise to improve treatment for people living with spinal cord injuries, giving back muscle function, sense of touch and other abilities that most of us take for granted.

€œA spinal injury brings very substantial life challenges, but advances in research now mean survivors can have a better quality of life – and even the hope can you buy amoxil online of a cure,” Mr Hazzard said. €œThese projects have great scope, from investigating ways to restore touch sensation through immersive virtual reality through to using electrical stimulation to improve breathing for people affected by the most severe form of paralysis.” The following grant recipients will conduct their research at the new NeuRA centre. Associate Professor Sylvia Gustin, The University of NSW, Neuroscience Research Australia – received $2.5 million for her research project on can you buy amoxil online using virtual reality training to restore touch sensation. Professor Jane Butler – Neuroscience Research Australia, The University of NSW, received $1.5 million to develop a treatment to restore voluntary function after spinal cord injury.

And Dr Euan McCaughey, Neuroscience Research Australia, The University of NSW, received $2.4 million for his research into using muscle stimulation to improve respiratory function for people with tetraplegia. The projects can you buy amoxil online have been awarded through the NSW Government’s Spinal Cord Injury Research Grants program, launched in November 2019, with guidance from an advisory committee of spinal cord injury experts. NeuRA CEO, Professor Peter Schofield, said the range and scope of the funded research projects held exciting promise for health related outcomes. €œNeuroscience Research Australia is at the forefront of spinal cord injury research in can you buy amoxil online Australia.

Our new Spinal Cord Injury Research Centre and these research projects will dramatically improve Australia’s understanding of how to best treat people with these life-long injuries,” Professor Schofield said. €œNeuRA thanks the NSW Government for funding the Spinal Cord Injury Research Grants Program, and SpinalCure Australia for its tireless efforts in campaigning for more research funding to improve the quality of life for people with a spinal cord injury.” Information on grant recipients and their research projects is available on the OHMR Funded Research Directory​​.​​​.

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Start Preamble Centers for where to get amoxil pills Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS). Notice. The Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Comments must be received by December 21, 2021.

When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways. 1. Electronically.

You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments. 2. By regular mail.

You may mail written comments to the following address. CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention. Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850.

Start Printed Page 58665 To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1. Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N.

Parham at (410) 786-4669. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections. More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES ). CMS-2567 Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction CMS-10790 Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub.

L. 116-93) CMS-10463 Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C.

3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice. Information Collection 1.

Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction Use.

The form CMS-2567 is the means by which State and CMS surveyors document findings of compliance or noncompliance (deficiencies) resulting from inspection of Medicare, Medicaid, and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratories. The form CMS-2567 is the legal, documentary basis for CMS' certification of a facility's compliance or noncompliance with the Medicare/Medicaid Conditions of Participation or Coverage, and the requirements for Nursing Home participation and CLIA certification. In December, 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA, 2021). Section 407 of CAA, 2021, amended Part A of Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) at section 1822 establishing hospice program survey and enforcement requirements.

This amendment, in part, now requires the Accrediting Organizations (AOs) that accredit hospice programs to include the form CMS-2567 to document the findings of their hospice program surveys beginning on October 1, 2021. As of June 2021, there are three AOs with CMS-approved hospice accreditation programs. The AOs survey approximately half of the over 5,000 Medicare-certified hospice programs, while the SAs survey the remaining half. Form Numbers.

CMS-2567 (OMB control number. 0938-0391). Frequency. Yearly and Occasionally.

Affected Public. Private Sector (Business or for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents. 65,948.

Total Annual Responses. 65,948. Total Annual Hours. 1,187,064.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) 2. Type of Information Collection Request. New collection (Request for a new OMB Control Number). Title of Information Collection.

Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub. L. 116-93). Use.

The requirements in this rule were announced in CMS-1752-P (FY22 IPPS). However, the PRA package has been under development until now. The plan, approved by OMB and CM, is to have the 60-day publish and then have CMS-1752-F2 serve as the 30-day notice, with the goal of approval in early January 2022. Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA), 2021 (Pub.

L. 116-93), enacted December 20, 2020, included a key provision affecting Medicare payments for Graduate Medical Education (GME). Section 126(a) of the CAA amended section 1886(h) of the Act by adding a new section 1886(h)(9) requiring the distribution of additional residency positions (slots) to qualifying hospitals. Section 1886(h)(9)(A) makes an additional 1,000 Medicare funded residency slots available to be phased in beginning in FY 2023 until the aggregate number of 1,000 full-time equivalent residency positions are distributed.

This approval request is for CMS to receive electronic applications for Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions submitted in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. The electronic applications will be submitted by the applicants in CMS' new Medicare Electronic Application Request Information SystemTM (MEARISTM). There is no existing, hard copy version of the application. The applications will provide CMS with the critical information necessary for CMS to process and score the applications in accordance with the policies finalized in the upcoming final rule to determine the disbursement of the slots and to announce the awardees by the January 31, 2023 required statutory deadline.

Form Number. CMS-10790 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW). Frequency.

Yearly. Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions), State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Number of Respondents.

1,325. Total Annual Responses. 1,325. Total Annual Hours.

10,600. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Noel Manlove at 410-786-5161.) 3. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection.

Title of Information Collection. Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges. Use. Section 1311(i) of the PPACA requires Exchanges to establish a Navigator grant program under which it awards grants to eligible individuals and entities (as described in Section 1311(i)(2) of the PPACA and 45 CFR 155.210(a) and (c)) applying to serve consumers in States with a FFE.

Navigators assist consumers by providing education about and facilitating selection of qualified health plans (QHPs) within the Exchanges, as well as other required duties. Entities and individuals cannot serve as federally certified Navigators and carry out the required duties without receiving federal cooperative agreement funding. On July 1, 2021, HHS published the Updating Payment Parameters, Section 1332 Waiver Implementing Regulations, and Improving Health Insurance Markets for 2022 and Beyond Proposed Rule proposed rule. The proposed regulations would amend federal regulations at 45 CFR 155.210(e)(9) to reinstitute the requirement that FFE Navigators provide consumers with information and assistance on access, affordability and certain post-enrollment topics, such Start Printed Page 58666 as the eligibility appeals process, the Exchange-related components of the Premium Tax Credit (PTC) reconciliation process, and the basic concepts and rights of health coverage and how to use it.

Under the Terms and Conditions of the Navigator program cooperative agreements, awardees must provide progress reports on a weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual basis during the cooperative agreement period of performance, and a final report at the end of the period of performance. Awardees will submit their progress reports electronically to CMS staff for evaluation and analysis. The results of this evaluation will provide feedback on the effectiveness of the Navigator program, so that HHS and CMS leadership may evaluate the effectiveness of the program and address any areas that need revisions. CMS will also use the information collected from Navigator grant awardees to inform the public about the availability of application and enrollment assistance services from designated organizations.

Form Number. CMS-10463 (OMB control number. 0938-1215). Frequency.

Annually, Monthly, Quarterly, Weekly. Affected Public. Private sector. Number of Respondents.

100. Total Annual Responses. 5,200. Total Annual Hours.

529,000. (For questions regarding this collection contact Gian Johnson at 301-492-4323.) Start Signature Dated. October 19, 2021. William N.

Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-23107 Filed 10-21-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Start Printed Page 58019 Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Final rule. Correction and correcting amendment. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the final rule that appeared in the August 13, 2021, issue of the Federal Register titled “Medicare Program.

Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2022 Rates. Quality Programs and Medicare Promoting Interoperability Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals. Changes to Medicaid Provider Enrollment. And Changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program.”   Effective date.

The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are effective on October 19, 2021. Applicability date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021. Start Further Info Donald Thompson, (410) 786-4487, and Michele Hudson, (410) 786-4487, Operating Prospective Payment, Wage Index, Hospital Geographic Reclassifications, Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payment Adjustment, Graduate Medical Education, and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Issues.

Mady Hue, (410) 786-4510, and Andrea Hazeley, (410) 786-3543, MS-DRG Classification Issues. Allison Pompey, (410) 786-2348, New Technology Add-On Payments Issues. Julia Venanzi, julia.venanzi@cms.hhs.gov, Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Programs. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I.

Background In FR Doc. 2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are identified and corrected in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021, as if they had been included in the document that appeared in the August 13, 2021, Federal Register. II.

Summary of Errors A. Summary of Errors in the Preamble On page 44878, we are correcting an inadvertent error in the reference to the number of technologies for which we proposed to allow a one-time extension of new technology add-on payments for fiscal year (FY) 2022. On page 44889, we are correcting an inadvertent typographical error in the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) procedure code describing the percutaneous endoscopic repair of the esophagus. On page 44960, in the table displaying the Medicare-Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) subject to the policy for replaced devices offered without cost or with a credit for FY 2022, we are correcting inadvertent typographical errors in the MS-DRGs describing Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with and without MCC, respectively.

On pages 45047, 45048, and 45049, in our discussion of the new technology add-on payments for FY 2022, we are correcting typographical and technical errors in referencing sections of the final rule. On page 45133, we are correcting an error in the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device. On page 45150, we inadvertently omitted ICD-10-CM codes from the list of diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of the INTERCEPT Fibrinogen Complex that would be eligible for new technology add-on payments. On page 45157, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of FETROJA® for HABP/VABP.

On page 45158, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of RECARBRIOTM for HABP/VABP. On pages 45291, 45293, and 45294, in three tables that display previously established, newly updated, and estimated performance standards for measures included in the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, we are correcting errors in the numerical values for all measures in the Clinical Outcomes Domain that appear in the three tables. On page 45312, in our discussion of payments for indirect and direct graduate medical education costs and Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data, we made a typographical error in our response to a comment. On page 45386, we made an inadvertent typographical error in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program Severe Hyperglycemia electronic clinical quality measure (eCQM).

On page 45400, in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program measures for fiscal year (FY) 2024, we mislabeled the table title and inadvertently included a measure not pertaining to the FY 2024 payment determination along with its corresponding footnote. On page 45404, in our discussion the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program, we included a table with the measures for the FY 2025 payment determination. In the notes that immediately followed the table, we made a typographical error in the date associated with the voluntary reporting period for the Hybrid Hospital-Wide All-Cause Risk Standardized Mortality (HWM) measure. B.

Summary of Errors in the Regulations Text On page 45521, in the regulations text for § 413.24(f)(5)(i) introductory text and (f)(5)(i)(A) regarding cost reporting forms and teaching hospitals, we inadvertently omitted revisions that were discussed in the preamble. C. Summary of Errors in the Addendum In the FY 2022 Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems and Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System (IPPS/LTCH PPS) final rule (85 FR 45166), we stated that we excluded the wage data for critical access hospitals (CAHs) as discussed in the FY 2004 IPPS final rule (68 FR 45397 through 45398). That is, any hospital that is designated as a CAH by 7 days prior to the publication of the preliminary wage index public use file (PUF) is excluded from the calculation Start Printed Page 58020 of the wage index.

We inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118) Therefore, we restored the wage data for this hospital and included it in our calculation of the wage index. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, and affected the final FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan 23 as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. As discussed in this section, the final FY 2022 IPPS wage index is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor) and the final outlier threshold.

We note, in the final rule, we correctly listed the number of hospitals with CAH status removed from the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166), the number of hospitals used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166) and the number of hospital occupational mix surveys used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45173). Additionally, the FY 2022 national average hourly wage (unadjusted for occupational mix) (86 FR 45172), the FY 2022 occupational mix adjusted national average hourly wage (86 FR 45173), and the FY 2022 national average hourly wages for the occupational mix nursing subcategories (86 FR 45174) listed in the final rule remain unchanged. Because the numbers and values noted previously are correctly stated in the preamble of the final rule and remain unchanged, we do not include any corrections in section IV.A. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

We made an inadvertent error in the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board (MGCRB) reclassification status of one hospital in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. Specifically, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed in Table 2 as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124 and affected the final FY 2022 wage index with reclassification.

The final FY 2022 IPPS wage index with reclassification is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor and the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor) and the final outlier threshold. As discussed further in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we made updates to the calculation of Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology to reflect updated information on hospital mergers received in response to the final rule and made corrections for report upload errors. Factor 3 determines the total amount of the uncompensated care payment a hospital is eligible to receive for a fiscal year.

This hospital-specific payment amount is then used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments a hospital receives per discharge. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, the revisions made to the calculation of Factor 3 to address additional merger information and report upload errors directly affected the calculation of total payments and required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. Due to the correction of the combination of errors that are discussed previously (correcting the number of hospitals with CAH status, the correction to the MGCRB reclassification status of one hospital, and the revisions to Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology), we recalculated all IPPS budget neutrality adjustment factors, the fixed-loss cost threshold, the final wage indexes (and geographic adjustment factors (GAFs)), the national operating standardized amounts and capital Federal rate.

We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. Therefore, we made conforming changes to the following. On page 45532, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors”. On page 45537, the estimated total Federal capital payments and the estimated capital outlier payments.

On pages 45542 and 45543, the calculation of the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold, total operating Federal payments, total operating outlier payments, the outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate and the related discussion of the percentage estimates of operating and capital outlier payments. On page 45545, the table titled “Changes from FY 2021 Standardized Amounts to the FY 2022 Standardized Amounts”. On pages 45553 through 45554, in our discussion of the determination of the Federal hospital inpatient capital related prospective payment rate update, due to the recalculation of the GAFs, we have made conforming corrections to the capital Federal rate. As a result of these changes, we also made conforming corrections in the table showing the comparison of factors and adjustments for the FY 2021 capital Federal rate and FY 2022 capital Federal rate.

As we noted in the final rule, the capital Federal rate is calculated using unrounded budget neutrality and outlier adjustment factors. The unrounded GAF/DRG budget neutrality factor, the unrounded Quartile/Cap budget neutrality factor, and the unrounded outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate were revised because of these errors. However, after rounding these factors to 4 decimal places as displayed in the final rule, the rounded factors were unchanged from the final rule. On pages 45570 and 45571, we are making conforming corrections to the national adjusted operating standardized amounts and capital standard Federal payment rate (which also include the rates payable to hospitals located in Puerto Rico) in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D as a result of the conforming corrections to certain budget neutrality factors, as previously described.

D. Summary of Errors in the Appendices On pages 45576 through 45580, 45582 through 45583, and 45598 through 45600, in our regulatory impact analyses, we have made conforming corrections to the factors, values, and tables and accompanying discussion of the changes in operating and capital IPPS payments for FY 2022 and the effects of certain IPPS budget neutrality factors as a result of the technical errors that lead to changes in our calculation of the operating and capital IPPS budget neutrality factors, outlier threshold, final wage indexes, operating standardized amounts, and capital Federal rate (as described in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment). These conforming corrections include changes to the following.

On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022”. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments per discharge)”. • On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “Table III—Comparison of Start Printed Page 58021 Total Payments per Case [FY 2021 Payments Compared to FY 2022 Payments]”. On pages 45584 and 45585 we are correcting the maximum new-technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of Fetroja, Recarbrio, Tecartus, and Abecma and related information in the untitled tables as well as making conforming corrections to the total estimated FY 2022 payments in the accompanying discussion of applications approved or conditionally approved for new technology add-on payments.

On pages 45587 through 45589, we are correcting the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, including the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)*—from FY 2021 to FY 2022”, in light of the corrections discussed in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. On pages 45610 and 45611, we are making conforming corrections to the estimated expenditures under the IPPS as a result of the corrections to the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device, Fetroja, Recarbrio, Abecma, and Tecartus as described in this section and in section II.A.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. E. Summary of Errors in and Corrections to Files and Tables Posted on the CMS Website We are correcting the errors in the following IPPS tables that are listed on pages 45569 and 45570 of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule and are available on the internet on the CMS website at https://www.cms.gov/​Medicare/​Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/​AcuteInpatientPPS/​index.html. The tables that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the revisions discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

Table 2—Case-Mix Index and Wage Index Table by CCN-FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we restored provider 230118 to the table. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

In this table, we are correcting the columns titled “Wage Index Payment CBSA” and “MGCRB Reclass” to accurately reflect its reclassification to CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124. As also discussed later in this section, because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to the affected values.

Table 3.—Wage Index Table by CBSA—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we recalculated the wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

In this table, we are correcting the values that changed as a result of these corrections as well as any corresponding changes. Table 4A.—List of Counties Eligible for the Out-Migration Adjustment under Section 1886(d)(13) of the Act—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index.

(CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

As a result, as discussed previously, we are making changes to the FY 2022 wage indexes. Because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to some of the out-migration adjustments listed in Table 4A. Table 6B.—New Procedure Codes—FY 2022.

We are correcting this table to reflect the assignment of procedure codes XW033A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) and XW043A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) to Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 (Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell and Other Immunotherapies). Table 6B inadvertently omitted Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 in Column E (MS-DRG) for assignment of these codes. Effective with discharges on and after April 1, 2022, conforming changes will be reflected in the Version 39.1 ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual and ICD-10 MS-DRG Grouper and Medicare Code Editor software. Table 6P.—ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Codes for MS-DRG Changes—FY 2022.

We are correcting Table 6P.1d associated with the final rule to reflect three procedure codes submitted by the requestor that were inadvertently omitted, resulting in 79 procedure codes listed instead of 82 procedure codes as indicated in the final rule (see pages 44808 and 44809). Table 18.—Final FY 2022 Medicare DSH Uncompensated Care Payment Factor 3. For the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, we published a list of hospitals that we identified to be subsection (d) hospitals and subsection (d) Puerto Rico hospitals projected to be eligible to receive interim uncompensated care payments for FY 2022. As stated in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (86 FR 45249), we allowed the public an additional period after the issuance of the final rule to review and submit comments on the accuracy of the list of mergers that we identified in the final rule.

Based on the comments received during this additional period, we are updating this table to reflect the merger information received in response to the final rule and to revise the Factor 3 calculations for purposes of determining uncompensated care payments for the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. We are revising Factor 3 for all hospitals to reflect the updated merger information received in response to the final rule. We are also revising the amount of the total uncompensated care payment calculated for each DSH eligible hospital. The total uncompensated care payment that a hospital receives is used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments the hospital receives per discharge.

Start Printed Page 58022 accordingly, we have also revised these amounts for all DSH eligible hospitals. These corrections will be reflected in Table 18 and the Medicare DSH Supplemental Data File. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, these corrections to uncompensated care payments required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors as well as the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold.

We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. In section IV.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we have made corresponding revisions to the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule to reflect the corrections discussed previously and to correct minor typographical errors. The files that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the corrections discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

In addition, we are correcting the inadvertent omission of the following 32 ICD-10-PCS codes describing percutaneous cardiovascular procedures involving one, two, three or four arteries from the GROUPER logic for MS-DRG 246 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents) and MS-DRG 248 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Non-Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents). ICD-10-PCS codeDescription02703Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02703ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02704Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02704ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C03Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C03ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02C04Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C04ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02713Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02713ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02714Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02714ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C13Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C13ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02C14Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C14ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02723Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02723ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02724Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02724ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C23Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C23ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02C24Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C24ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02733Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02733ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02734Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02734ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C33Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C33ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02C34Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C34ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach. We have corrected the ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual Version 39 and the ICD-10 MS-DRG GROUPER and MCE Version 39 Software to correctly reflect the inclusion of these codes in the arterial logic lists for MS-DRGs 246 and 248 for FY 2022. III.

Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking and Delay in Effective Date Under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), the agency is required to publish a notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register before the provisions of a rule take effect. Similarly, section 1871(b)(1) of the Act requires the Secretary to provide for notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register and provide a period of not less than 60 days for public comment. In addition, section 553(d) of the APA, and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(i) of the Act mandate a 30-day delay in effective date after issuance or publication of a rule.

Sections 553(b)(B) and 553(d)(3) of the APA provide for exceptions from the notice and comment and delay in effective date APA requirements. In cases in which these exceptions apply, sections 1871(b)(2)(C) and 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act provide exceptions from the notice and 60-day comment period and delay in effective date requirements of the Act as well. Section 553(b)(B) of the APA and section 1871(b)(2)(C) of the Act authorize an agency to dispense with normal rulemaking requirements for good cause if the agency makes a finding that the notice and comment process are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. In addition, both section 553(d)(3) of the APA and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act allow the agency to avoid the 30-day delay in effective date where such delay is contrary to the public interest and an agency includes a statement of support.

We believe that this final rule correction and correcting amendment does not constitute a rule that would be subject to the notice and comment or Start Printed Page 58023 delayed effective date requirements. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the preamble, regulations text, addendum, payment rates, tables, and appendices included or referenced in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, but does not make substantive changes to the policies or payment methodologies that were adopted in the final rule. As a result, this final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended to ensure that the information in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects the policies adopted in that document. In addition, even if this were a rule to which the notice and comment procedures and delayed effective date requirements applied, we find that there is good cause to waive such requirements.

Undertaking further notice and comment procedures to incorporate the corrections in this document into the final rule or delaying the effective date would be contrary to the public interest because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies. Furthermore, such procedures would be unnecessary, as we are not altering our payment methodologies or policies, but rather, we are simply implementing correctly the methodologies and policies that we previously proposed, requested comment on, and subsequently finalized. This final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended solely to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects these payment methodologies and policies. Therefore, we believe we have good cause to waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements.

Moreover, even if these corrections were considered to be retroactive rulemaking, they would be authorized under section 1871(e)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, which permits the Secretary to issue a rule for the Medicare program with retroactive effect if the failure to do so would be contrary to the public interest. As we have explained previously, we believe it would be contrary to the public interest not to implement the corrections in this final rule correction and correcting amendment because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc.

2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), we are making the following corrections. A. Correction of Errors in the Preamble 1. On page 44878, second column, last paragraph, line 10, “15 technologies” is corrected to read “technologies.” 2.

On page 44889, lower two-thirds of the page, third column, partial paragraph, line 10, the procedure code “0DQ540ZZ” is corrected to read “0DQ54ZZ.” 3. On page 44960, in the untitled table, last 2 lines are corrected to read as follows. MDCMS-DRGMS-DRG title *         *         *         *         *         *         *08521Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with MCC.08522Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture without MCC. 4.

On page 45047. A. Second column, first full paragraph, lines 21 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”.

B. Third column, first full paragraph, line 28, the reference “section XXX” is corrected to read “section II.F.8.”. 5. On page 45048, second column, second full paragraph, lines 20 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7.

Of the preamble of this final rule.”. 6. On page 45049. A.

Second column. (1) First full paragraph, line 12, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.8. Of the preamble of this final rule”. (2) Second full paragraph, lines 1 and 2, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.7.

J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H.

Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei) (pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 10. On page 45158, third column, first partial paragraph, last line the phrase, “technology group 5).” is corrected to read “technology group 5) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. Y95 (Nosocomial condition) and one of the following. J14.0 (Pneumonia due to Hemophilus influenzae) J15.0 (Pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae), J15.1 (Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas), J15.5 (Pneumonia due to Escherichia coli), J15.6 (Pneumonia due to other Gram-negative bacteria), or J15.8 (Pneumonia due to other specified bacteria) for HABP and ICD10-PCS codes.

XW033A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol antinfective into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) or XW043A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol anti-infective into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] Start Printed Page 58024 [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei)(pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 11. On page 45291, middle of the page, the table titled “Table V.H-11. Previously Established and Newly Updated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-11—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8692470.887868MORT-30-HF #0.8823080.907773MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8402810.872976MORT-30-COPD #0.9164910.934002MORT-30-CABG #0.9694990.980319COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253960.018159♢  As discussed in section V.H.4.b. Of this final rule, we are finalizing the updates to the FY 2024 baseline periods for measures included in the Person and Community Engagement, Safety, and Efficiency and Cost Reduction domains to use CY 2019. Therefore, the performance standards displayed in this table for the Safety domain measures were calculated using CY 2019 data.* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 12.

On page 45293, top of the page, the table titled “V.H-13 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows. Table V.H-13—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8726240.889994MORT-30-HF #0.8839900.910344MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8414750.874425MORT-30-COPD #0.9151270.932236MORT-30-CABG #0.9701000.979775COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253320.017946* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 13. On page 45294, top of page, the table titled “V.H-14 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-14—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8744260.890687MORT-30-HF #0.8859490.912874MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8433690.877097MORT-30-COPD #0.9146910.932157MORT-30-CABG #0.9705680.980473COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0240190.016873* Lower values represent better performance. Start Printed Page 58025#  Previously established performance standards. 14. On page 45312, second column, first full paragraph, lines 7 through 9, the phrase “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do match” is corrected to read “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do not match”.

15. On page 45386, third column, first full paragraph, line 12, the phrase “mellitus and who either” is corrected to read “mellitus, who”. 16. On page 45400, top of the page, the table titled “Measures for the FY 2024 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, is corrected by— a.

Correcting the title to read “Measures for the FY 2023 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”. B. Removing the heading “Claims and Electronic Data Measures” and the entry “Hybrid HWR**” (rows 20 and 21). C.

Following the table, lines 3 through 8, removing the second table note. 17. On page 45404, bottom of the page, after the table titled “Measures for the FY 2025 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, in the third note to the table, line 10, the parenthetical phrase “(July 1, 2023-June 30, 2023)” is corrected to read “(July 1, 2022-June 30, 2023)”. B.

Correction of Errors in the Addendum 1. On page 45532, bottom of the page, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors” is corrected to read as follows. Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality FactorsMS-DRG Reclassification and Recalibration Budget Neutrality Factor1.000107Wage Index Budget Neutrality Factor1.000715Reclassification Budget Neutrality Factor0.986741*Rural Floor Budget Neutrality Factor0.992868Rural Demonstration Budget Neutrality Factor0.999361Low Wage Index Hospital Policy Budget Neutrality Factor0.998029Transition Budget Neutrality Factor0.999859* The rural floor budget neutrality factor is applied to the national wage indexes while the rest of the budget neutrality adjustments are applied to the standardized amounts. 2.

On page 45537, first column, first full paragraph, lines 4 through 10, the parenthetical phrase “(estimated capital outlier payments of $ 430,689,396 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,689,396 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,990,253)).” is corrected to read “(estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,964,386)).”. 3. On page 45542, third column, last paragraph, lines 23 and 24, the figure “$5,326,356,951” is corrected to read “$5,326,379,560”. 4.

On page 45543. A. Top of the page, first column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$100,164,666,975” is corrected to read “$100,165,281,272”.

(2) Line 17, the figure “$31,108” is corrected to read “$31,109”. B. Middle of the page, the untitled table is corrected to read as follows. €ƒOperating standardized amountsCapital Federal rate *National0.9490.947078* The adjustment factor for the capital Federal rate includes an adjustment to the estimated percentage of FY 2022 capital outlier payments for capital outlier reconciliation, as discussed previously and in section III.

A. 2 in the Addendum of this final rule. 5. On page 45545, the table titled “CHANGES FROM FY 2021 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS TO THE FY 2022 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58026 6. On page 45553, second column, last paragraph, line 9, the figure “$472.60” is corrected to read “$472.59”. 7. On page 45554, top of the page, in the table titled “COMPARISON OF FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENTS.

FY 2021 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE AND THE FY 2022 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE”, the list entry (row 5) is corrected to read as follows. Comparison of Factors and Adjustments. FY 2021 Capital Federal Rate and the FY 2022 Capital Federal Rate FY 2021FY 2022ChangePercent change *         *         *         *         *         *         *Capital Federal Rate$466.21$472.591.01374  1.37 8. On page 45570.

A. The table titled “TABLE 1A.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (67.6 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/32.4 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS GREATER THAN 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1A—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (67.6 Percent Labor Share/32.4 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index Is Greater Than 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$4,138.24$1,983.41$4,056.08$1,944.03$4,110.85$1,970.28$4,028.70$1,930.91 Start Printed Page 58027 b. The table titled “TABLE 1B.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Table 1B—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,720.07$2,280.04$3,770.30$2,310.83$3,694.96$2,264.65 9. On page 45571, the top of page. A. The table titled “Table 1C.—ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS FOR HOSPITALS IN PUERTO RICO, LABOR/NONLABOR (NATIONAL.

62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE BECAUSE WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1C—Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts for Hospitals in Puerto Rico, Labor/Nonlabor (National. 62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share Because Wage Index Is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022 Rates if wage index greater than 1Hospital is a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 2.0)Hospital is NOT a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 1.325)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor1  NationalNot ApplicableNot Applicable$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,770.30$2,310.831  For FY 2022, there are no CBSAs in Puerto Rico with a national wage index greater than 1. B.

The table titled “TABLE 1D.—CAPITAL STANDARD FEDERAL PAYMENT RATE—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1D—Capital Standard Federal Payment Rate—FY 2022 RateNational$472.59 C. Correction of Errors in the Appendices 1. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I.—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58028 Start Printed Page 58029 Start Printed Page 58030 2. On page 45579, third column, first paragraph, line 23, the figure “1.000712” is corrected to read “1.000715”. Start Printed Page 58031 3. On page 45580, lower three-fourths of the page, first column, third full paragraph, line 6, the figure “0.986737” is corrected to read “0.986741”.

4. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II.—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments Per Discharge)” is corrected to read as follows. Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System[Payments per discharge] Number of hospitalsEstimated average FY 2021 payment per dischargeEstimated average FY 2022 payment per dischargeFY 2022 changes (1)(2)(3)(4)All Hospitals3,19513,10913,4482.6By Geographic Location:Urban hospitals2,45913,45413,8002.6Rural hospitals7369,90110,1782.8Bed Size (Urban):0-99 beds63410,72311,0112.7100-199 beds75411,01511,3052.6200-299 beds42712,25112,5512.4300-499 beds42113,49613,8472.6500 or more beds22316,56816,9922.6Bed Size (Rural):0-49 beds3118,5568,9214.350-99 beds2539,4199,6442.4100-149 beds949,78910,0332.5150-199 beds3910,51910,7882.6200 or more beds3911,46511,7842.8Urban by Region:New England11214,85815,2532.7Middle Atlantic30415,43215,8142.5East North Central38112,83813,1502.4West North Central16013,12113,4752.7South Atlantic40211,71012,0492.9East South Central14411,29011,5762.5West South Central36411,80612,0722.3Mountain17213,69814,0542.6Pacific37017,23017,6642.5Puerto Rico508,4918,6371.7Rural by Region:New England1913,99014,4633.4Middle Atlantic509,7369,9882.6East North Central11310,36110,5922.2West North Central8910,63810,9322.8South Atlantic1149,0329,3023East South Central1448,7328,9552.6West South Central1358,2928,5403Mountain4812,13412,3591.9Pacific2413,86514,5885.2By Payment Classification:Urban hospitals1,98312,67313,0032.6Rural areas1,21213,79614,1482.6Teaching Status:Nonteaching2,03110,67710,9632.7Fewer than 100 residents90712,38812,6942.5100 or more residents25718,93819,4372.6Urban DSH:Non-DSH50211,74912,0542.6100 or more beds1,22713,01513,3552.6Less than 100 beds3489,5599,8202.7Rural DSH:SCH26511,90612,2032.5RRC60814,38014,7472.6100 or more beds3012,11512,2981.5Less than 100 beds2157,7788,0253.2Urban teaching and DSH:Both teaching and DSH67914,11614,4832.6Teaching and no DSH7412,82513,1272.4No teaching and DSH89610,85011,1372.6No teaching and no DSH33410,82411,1102.6Special Hospital Types:Start Printed Page 58032RRC52314,47814,8592.6SCH30512,05312,3562.5MDH1539,1699,4042.6SCH and RRC15412,47512,7462.2MDH and RRC2710,62210,8532.2Type of Ownership:Voluntary1,88113,32113,6672.6Proprietary82811,47311,7692.6Government48614,10914,4662.5Medicare Utilization as a Percent of Inpatient Days:0-2564315,15815,5352.525-502,11012,92613,2682.650-6536710,77311,0102.2Over 65508,1328,4313.7FY 2022 Reclassifications by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board:All Reclassified Hospitals93413,59213,9442.6Non-Reclassified Hospitals2,26112,77213,1022.6Urban Hospitals Reclassified74914,26114,6192.5Urban Nonreclassified Hospitals1,72312,85113,1872.6Rural Hospitals Reclassified Full Year30010,08710,3412.5Rural Nonreclassified Hospitals Full Year4239,6109,9293.3All Section 401 Reclassified Hospitals53214,96815,3432.5Other Reclassified Hospitals (Section 1886(d)(8)(B))569,1499,4293.1 5. On page 45584, bottom third of the page, third column, partial paragraph.

A. Line 7, the figure “$151 million” is corrected to read “$158 million”. B. Line 10, the figure “$50 million” is corrected to read “$57 million”.

C. Lines 15 and 16, the phrase “for which we are approving new technology add-on payments” is corrected to read “for which we are approving or conditionally approving new technology add-on payments”. 6. On page 45585.

A. Top third of the page. (1) In the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 6 and 9 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impactPathway (QIDP, LPAD, or breakthrough device) *         *         *         *         *         *         *Fetroja (HABP/VABP)379$8,579.84$3,251,759.36QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         *Recarbrio (HABP/VABP)9289,576.518,887,001.28QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         * (2) Following the first untitled table, second column, partial paragraph, last line, the figure “$498 million” is corrected to read “$514 million”.

B. Middle third of the page, in the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 2 and 4 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impact *         *         *         *         *         *         *Abecma484$272,675.00$131,974,700.00 Start Printed Page 58033*         *         *         *         *         *         *Tecartus15259,350.003,890,250.00 *         *         *         *         *         *         * 7. On pages 45587 and 45588, the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type.

Model Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)—from FY 2021 to FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58034 Start Printed Page 58035 8. On page 45588, lower half of the page, beginning with the second column, first full paragraph, line 1 with the phrase “Rural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience” and ending in the third column last paragraph with the phrase “15.22 percent. All” the paragraphs are corrected to read as follows.

€œRural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience larger decreases in uncompensated care payments than their urban counterparts. Overall, rural hospitals are projected to receive a 17.28 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a greater decrease than the overall hospital average, while urban hospitals are projected to receive a 12.99 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, similar to the overall hospital average. By bed size, smaller rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decreases in uncompensated care payments. Rural hospitals with 0-99 beds are projected to receive an 18.97 percent payment decrease, and rural hospitals with 100-249 beds are projected to receive a 15.53 percent decrease.

In contrast, larger rural hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 14.16 percent payment decrease. Among urban hospitals, the smallest urban hospitals, those with 0-99 and 100-249 beds, are projected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments that is greater than the overall hospital average, at 15.49 and 15.50 percent, respectively. In contrast, the largest urban hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 12.02 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a smaller decrease than the overall hospital average. By region, rural hospitals are expected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments in all Regions, except for rural hospitals in New England, which are projected to receive a decrease of 1.27 percent in uncompensated care payments, and rural hospitals in the East South Central Region, which are projected to receive a smaller than average decrease of 13.01 percent.

Regionally, urban hospitals are projected to receive a more varied range of payment changes. Urban hospitals in the New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific Regions are projected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the South Atlantic, East North Central, West North Central, West South Central, and Mountain Regions, as well as hospitals in Puerto Rico are projected to receive smaller than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the East South Central Region are projected to receive an average decrease in uncompensated care payments.

By payment classification, although hospitals in urban areas overall are expected to receive a 12.74 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, hospitals in large urban areas are expected to see a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 13.52 percent, while hospitals in other urban areas are expected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 11.21 percent. Rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decrease of 14.23 percent. Nonteaching hospitals are projected to receive a payment decrease of 13.4 percent, teaching hospitals with fewer than 100 residents are projected to receive a payment decrease of 12.94 percent, and teaching hospitals with 100+ residents have a projected payment decrease of 13.39 percent. All of these decreases closely approximate the overall hospital average.

Proprietary and voluntary hospitals are projected to receive smaller than average decreases of 11.56 and 12.61 percent respectively, while government hospitals are expected to receive a larger payment decrease of 15.21 percent. All”. 9. On page 45589, first column, first partial paragraph, the phrase “hospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.79 and 32.81 percent, respectively.” is corrected to read as follows.

€œhospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.85 and 32.86 percent, respectively.” Start Printed Page 58036 10. On page 45598, third column, last paragraph, lines 21 through 23, the sentence “The estimated percentage increase for both rural reclassified and nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” is corrected to read “The estimated percentage increase for rural reclassified hospitals is 1.3 percent, while the estimated percentage increase for rural nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” 11. On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “TABLE III.—COMPARISON OF TOTAL PAYMENTS PER CASE [FY 2021 PAYMENTS COMPARED TO FY 2022 PAYMENTS]” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58037 Start Printed Page 58038 12.

On page 45610. A. Second column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”.

(2) Line 11, the figure “$0.65” is corrected to read “$0.68”. B. Third column, last full paragraph, last line, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. 13.

On page 45611, the table titled “Table V—ACCOUNTING STATEMENT. CLASSIFICATION OF ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE IPPS FROM FY 2021 TO FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58039 CategoryTransfersAnnualized Monetized Transfers$2.316 billion.From Whom to WhomFederal Government to IPPS Medicare Providers. Start List of Subjects DiseasesHealth facilitiesMedicarePuerto RicoReporting and recordkeeping requirements End List of Subjects As noted in section II.B.

Of the preamble, the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services is making the following correcting amendments to 42 CFR part 413. Start Part End Part Start Amendment Part1. The authority citation for part 413 continues to read as follows.

End Amendment Part Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 1302, 1395d(d), 1395f(b), 1395g, 1395l(a), (i), and (n), 1395x(v), 1395hh, 1395rr, 1395tt, and 1395ww. End Authority Start Amendment Part2. Amend § 413.24 by.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Parta. In paragraph (f)(5)(i) introductory text, removing the phrase “except as provided in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:” and adding in its place the phrase “except as provided in paragraphs (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( ii ) and (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:”. And End Amendment Part Start Amendment Partb. Revising paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A).

End Amendment Part The revision reads as follows. Adequate cost data and cost finding. * * * * * (f) * * * (5) * * * (i) * * * (A) Teaching hospitals. For teaching hospitals, the Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data.

( 1 ) Data format. For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must be in the new XML IRIS format. ( 2 ) Resident counts. ( i ) Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must contain the same total counts of direct GME FTE residents (unweighted and weighted) and IME FTE residents as the total counts of direct GME FTE and IME FTE residents reported in the provider's cost report.

( ii ) For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, and before October 1, 2022, the cost report is not rejected if the requirement in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( i ) of this section is not met. * * * * * Start Signature Karuna Seshasai, Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-P[FR Doc. 2021-22724 Filed 10-19-21.

Start Preamble http://www.onprodny.com/how-do-you-get-levitra/ Centers can you buy amoxil online for Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS). Notice. The Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public.

Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Comments must be received by December 21, 2021. When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways.

1. Electronically. You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments. 2.

By regular mail. You may mail written comments to the following address. CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention. Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850.

Start Printed Page 58665 To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1. Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N. Parham at (410) 786-4669.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections. More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES ). CMS-2567 Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction CMS-10790 Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub. L. 116-93) CMS-10463 Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges Under the PRA (44 U.S.C.

3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice.

Information Collection 1. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction Use.

The form CMS-2567 is the means by which State and CMS surveyors document findings of compliance or noncompliance (deficiencies) resulting from inspection of Medicare, Medicaid, and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratories. The form CMS-2567 is the legal, documentary basis for CMS' certification of a facility's compliance or noncompliance with the Medicare/Medicaid Conditions of Participation or Coverage, and the requirements for Nursing Home participation and CLIA certification. In December, 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA, 2021). Section 407 of CAA, 2021, amended Part A of Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) at section 1822 establishing hospice program survey and enforcement requirements. This amendment, in part, now requires the Accrediting Organizations (AOs) that accredit hospice programs to include the form CMS-2567 to document the findings of their hospice program surveys beginning on October 1, 2021.

As of June 2021, there are three AOs with CMS-approved hospice accreditation programs. The AOs survey approximately half of the over 5,000 Medicare-certified hospice programs, while the SAs survey the remaining half. Form Numbers. CMS-2567 (OMB control number. 0938-0391).

Frequency. Yearly and Occasionally. Affected Public. Private Sector (Business or for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents.

65,948. Total Annual Responses. 65,948. Total Annual Hours. 1,187,064.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) 2. Type of Information Collection Request. New collection (Request for a new OMB Control Number). Title of Information Collection. Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub.

L. 116-93). Use. The requirements in this rule were announced in CMS-1752-P (FY22 IPPS). However, the PRA package has been under development until now.

The plan, approved by OMB and CM, is to have the 60-day publish and then have CMS-1752-F2 serve as the 30-day notice, with the goal of approval in early January 2022. Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA), 2021 (Pub. L. 116-93), enacted December 20, 2020, included a key provision affecting Medicare payments for Graduate Medical Education (GME). Section 126(a) of the CAA amended section 1886(h) of the Act by adding a new section 1886(h)(9) requiring the distribution of additional residency positions (slots) to qualifying hospitals.

Section 1886(h)(9)(A) makes an additional 1,000 Medicare funded residency slots available to be phased in beginning in FY 2023 until the aggregate number of 1,000 full-time equivalent residency positions are distributed. This approval request is for CMS to receive electronic applications for Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions submitted in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. The electronic applications will be submitted by the applicants in CMS' new Medicare Electronic Application Request Information SystemTM (MEARISTM). There is no existing, hard copy version of the application. The applications will provide CMS with the critical information necessary for CMS to process and score the applications in accordance with the policies finalized in the upcoming final rule to determine the disbursement of the slots and to announce the awardees by the January 31, 2023 required statutory deadline.

Form Number. CMS-10790 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW). Frequency. Yearly.

Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions), State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Number of Respondents. 1,325. Total Annual Responses.

1,325. Total Annual Hours. 10,600. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Noel Manlove at 410-786-5161.) 3. Type of Information Collection Request.

Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges. Use. Section 1311(i) of the PPACA requires Exchanges to establish a Navigator grant program under which it awards grants to eligible individuals and entities (as described in Section 1311(i)(2) of the PPACA and 45 CFR 155.210(a) and (c)) applying to serve consumers in States with a FFE.

Navigators assist consumers by providing education about and facilitating selection of qualified health plans (QHPs) within the Exchanges, as well as other required duties. Entities and individuals cannot serve as federally certified Navigators and carry out the required duties without receiving federal cooperative agreement funding. On July 1, 2021, HHS published the Updating Payment Parameters, Section 1332 Waiver Implementing Regulations, and Improving Health Insurance Markets for 2022 and Beyond Proposed Rule proposed rule. The proposed regulations would amend federal regulations at 45 CFR 155.210(e)(9) to reinstitute the requirement that FFE Navigators provide consumers with information and assistance on access, affordability and certain post-enrollment topics, such Start Printed Page 58666 as the eligibility appeals process, the Exchange-related components of the Premium Tax Credit (PTC) reconciliation process, and the basic concepts and rights of health coverage and how to use it. Under the Terms and Conditions of the Navigator program cooperative agreements, awardees must provide progress reports on a weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual basis during the cooperative agreement period of performance, and a final report at the end of the period of performance.

Awardees will submit their progress reports electronically to CMS staff for evaluation and analysis. The results of this evaluation will provide feedback on the effectiveness of the Navigator program, so that HHS and CMS leadership may evaluate the effectiveness of the program and address any areas that need revisions. CMS will also use the information collected from Navigator grant awardees to inform the public about the availability of application and enrollment assistance services from designated organizations. Form Number. CMS-10463 (OMB control number.

0938-1215). Frequency. Annually, Monthly, Quarterly, Weekly. Affected Public. Private sector.

Number of Respondents. 100. Total Annual Responses. 5,200. Total Annual Hours.

529,000. (For questions regarding this collection contact Gian Johnson at 301-492-4323.) Start Signature Dated. October 19, 2021. William N. Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-23107 Filed 10-21-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Start Printed Page 58019 Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Final rule.

Correction and correcting amendment. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the final rule that appeared in the August 13, 2021, issue of the Federal Register titled “Medicare Program. Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2022 Rates. Quality Programs and Medicare Promoting Interoperability Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals. Changes to Medicaid Provider Enrollment.

And Changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program.”   Effective date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are effective on October 19, 2021. Applicability date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021. Start Further Info Donald Thompson, (410) 786-4487, and Michele Hudson, (410) 786-4487, Operating Prospective Payment, Wage Index, Hospital Geographic Reclassifications, Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payment Adjustment, Graduate Medical Education, and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Issues.

Mady Hue, (410) 786-4510, and Andrea Hazeley, (410) 786-3543, MS-DRG Classification Issues. Allison Pompey, (410) 786-2348, New Technology Add-On Payments Issues. Julia Venanzi, julia.venanzi@cms.hhs.gov, Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Programs. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I. Background In FR Doc.

2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are identified and corrected in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021, as if they had been included in the document that appeared in the August 13, 2021, Federal Register. II. Summary of Errors A. Summary of Errors in the Preamble On page 44878, we are correcting an inadvertent error in the reference to the number of technologies for which we proposed to allow a one-time extension of new technology add-on payments for fiscal year (FY) 2022.

On page 44889, we are correcting an inadvertent typographical error in the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) procedure code describing the percutaneous endoscopic repair of the esophagus. On page 44960, in the table displaying the Medicare-Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) subject to the policy for replaced devices offered without cost or with a credit for FY 2022, we are correcting inadvertent typographical errors in the MS-DRGs describing Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with and without MCC, respectively. On pages 45047, 45048, and 45049, in our discussion of the new technology add-on payments for FY 2022, we are correcting typographical and technical errors in referencing sections of the final rule. On page 45133, we are correcting an error in the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device. On page 45150, we inadvertently omitted ICD-10-CM codes from the list of diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of the INTERCEPT Fibrinogen Complex that would be eligible for new technology add-on payments.

On page 45157, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of FETROJA® for HABP/VABP. On page 45158, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of RECARBRIOTM for HABP/VABP. On pages 45291, 45293, and 45294, in three tables that display previously established, newly updated, and estimated performance standards for measures included in the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, we are correcting errors in the numerical values for all measures in the Clinical Outcomes Domain that appear in the three tables. On page 45312, in our discussion of payments for indirect and direct graduate medical education costs and Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data, we made a typographical error in our response to a comment. On page 45386, we made an inadvertent typographical error in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program Severe Hyperglycemia electronic clinical quality measure (eCQM).

On page 45400, in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program measures for fiscal year (FY) 2024, we mislabeled the table title and inadvertently included a measure not pertaining to the FY 2024 payment determination along with its corresponding footnote. On page 45404, in our discussion the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program, we included a table with the measures for the FY 2025 payment determination. In the notes that immediately followed the table, we made a typographical error in the date associated with the voluntary reporting period for the Hybrid Hospital-Wide All-Cause Risk Standardized Mortality (HWM) measure. B. Summary of Errors in the Regulations Text On page 45521, in the regulations text for § 413.24(f)(5)(i) introductory text and (f)(5)(i)(A) regarding cost reporting forms and teaching hospitals, we inadvertently omitted revisions that were discussed in the preamble.

C. Summary of Errors in the Addendum In the FY 2022 Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems and Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System (IPPS/LTCH PPS) final rule (85 FR 45166), we stated that we excluded the wage data for critical access hospitals (CAHs) as discussed in the FY 2004 IPPS final rule (68 FR 45397 through 45398). That is, any hospital that is designated as a CAH by 7 days prior to the publication of the preliminary wage index public use file (PUF) is excluded from the calculation Start Printed Page 58020 of the wage index. We inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118) Therefore, we restored the wage data for this hospital and included it in our calculation of the wage index.

This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, and affected the final FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan 23 as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. As discussed in this section, the final FY 2022 IPPS wage index is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor) and the final outlier threshold. We note, in the final rule, we correctly listed the number of hospitals with CAH status removed from the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166), the number of hospitals used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166) and the number of hospital occupational mix surveys used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45173). Additionally, the FY 2022 national average hourly wage (unadjusted for occupational mix) (86 FR 45172), the FY 2022 occupational mix adjusted national average hourly wage (86 FR 45173), and the FY 2022 national average hourly wages for the occupational mix nursing subcategories (86 FR 45174) listed in the final rule remain unchanged. Because the numbers and values noted previously are correctly stated in the preamble of the final rule and remain unchanged, we do not include any corrections in section IV.A.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. We made an inadvertent error in the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board (MGCRB) reclassification status of one hospital in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. Specifically, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed in Table 2 as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124 and affected the final FY 2022 wage index with reclassification.

The final FY 2022 IPPS wage index with reclassification is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor and the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor) and the final outlier threshold. As discussed further in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we made updates to the calculation of Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology to reflect updated information on hospital mergers received in response to the final rule and made corrections for report upload errors. Factor 3 determines the total amount of the uncompensated care payment a hospital is eligible to receive for a fiscal year. This hospital-specific payment amount is then used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments a hospital receives per discharge.

Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, the revisions made to the calculation of Factor 3 to address additional merger information and report upload errors directly affected the calculation of total payments and required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. Due to the correction of the combination of errors that are discussed previously (correcting the number of hospitals with CAH status, the correction to the MGCRB reclassification status of one hospital, and the revisions to Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology), we recalculated all IPPS budget neutrality adjustment factors, the fixed-loss cost threshold, the final wage indexes (and geographic adjustment factors (GAFs)), the national operating standardized amounts and capital Federal rate. We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. Therefore, we made conforming changes to the following.

On page 45532, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors”. On page 45537, the estimated total Federal capital payments and the estimated capital outlier payments. On pages 45542 and 45543, the calculation of the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold, total operating Federal payments, total operating outlier payments, the outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate and the related discussion of the percentage estimates of operating and capital outlier payments. On page 45545, the table titled “Changes from FY 2021 Standardized Amounts to the FY 2022 Standardized Amounts”. On pages 45553 through 45554, in our discussion of the determination of the Federal hospital inpatient capital related prospective payment rate update, due to the recalculation of the GAFs, we have made conforming corrections to the capital Federal rate.

As a result of these changes, we also made conforming corrections in the table showing the comparison of factors and adjustments for the FY 2021 capital Federal rate and FY 2022 capital Federal rate. As we noted in the final rule, the capital Federal rate is calculated using unrounded budget neutrality and outlier adjustment factors. The unrounded GAF/DRG budget neutrality factor, the unrounded Quartile/Cap budget neutrality factor, and the unrounded outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate were revised because of these errors. However, after rounding these factors to 4 decimal places as displayed in the final rule, the rounded factors were unchanged from the final rule. On pages 45570 and 45571, we are making conforming corrections to the national adjusted operating standardized amounts and capital standard Federal payment rate (which also include the rates payable to hospitals located in Puerto Rico) in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D as a result of the conforming corrections to certain budget neutrality factors, as previously described.

D. Summary of Errors in the Appendices On pages 45576 through 45580, 45582 through 45583, and 45598 through 45600, in our regulatory impact analyses, we have made conforming corrections to the factors, values, and tables and accompanying discussion of the changes in operating and capital IPPS payments for FY 2022 and the effects of certain IPPS budget neutrality factors as a result of the technical errors that lead to changes in our calculation of the operating and capital IPPS budget neutrality factors, outlier threshold, final wage indexes, operating standardized amounts, and capital Federal rate (as described in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment). These conforming corrections include changes to the following. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022”.

On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments per discharge)”. • On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “Table III—Comparison of Start Printed Page 58021 Total Payments per Case [FY 2021 Payments Compared to FY 2022 Payments]”. On pages 45584 and 45585 we are correcting the maximum new-technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of Fetroja, Recarbrio, Tecartus, and Abecma and related information in the untitled tables as well as making conforming corrections to the total estimated FY 2022 payments in the accompanying discussion of applications approved or conditionally approved for new technology add-on payments. On pages 45587 through 45589, we are correcting the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, including the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)*—from FY 2021 to FY 2022”, in light of the corrections discussed in section II.E.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. On pages 45610 and 45611, we are making conforming corrections to the estimated expenditures under the IPPS as a result of the corrections to the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device, Fetroja, Recarbrio, Abecma, and Tecartus as described in this section and in section II.A. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. E. Summary of Errors in and Corrections to Files and Tables Posted on the CMS Website We are correcting the errors in the following IPPS tables that are listed on pages 45569 and 45570 of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule and are available on the internet on the CMS website at https://www.cms.gov/​Medicare/​Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/​AcuteInpatientPPS/​index.html.

The tables that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the revisions discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. Table 2—Case-Mix Index and Wage Index Table by CCN-FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we restored provider 230118 to the table. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. In this table, we are correcting the columns titled “Wage Index Payment CBSA” and “MGCRB Reclass” to accurately reflect its reclassification to CBSA 45780.

This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124. As also discussed later in this section, because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to the affected values. Table 3.—Wage Index Table by CBSA—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Therefore, we recalculated the wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124.

The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. In this table, we are correcting the values that changed as a result of these corrections as well as any corresponding changes. Table 4A.—List of Counties Eligible for the Out-Migration Adjustment under Section 1886(d)(13) of the Act—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index.

(CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. As a result, as discussed previously, we are making changes to the FY 2022 wage indexes.

Because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to some of the out-migration adjustments listed in Table 4A. Table 6B.—New Procedure Codes—FY 2022. We are correcting this table to reflect the assignment of procedure codes XW033A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) and XW043A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) to Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 (Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell and Other Immunotherapies). Table 6B inadvertently omitted Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 in Column E (MS-DRG) for assignment of these codes.

Effective with discharges on and after April 1, 2022, conforming changes will be reflected in the Version 39.1 ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual and ICD-10 MS-DRG Grouper and Medicare Code Editor software. Table 6P.—ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Codes for MS-DRG Changes—FY 2022. We are correcting Table 6P.1d associated with the final rule to reflect three procedure codes submitted by the requestor that were inadvertently omitted, resulting in 79 procedure codes listed instead of 82 procedure codes as indicated in the final rule (see pages 44808 and 44809). Table 18.—Final FY 2022 Medicare DSH Uncompensated Care Payment Factor 3. For the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, we published a list of hospitals that we identified to be subsection (d) hospitals and subsection (d) Puerto Rico hospitals projected to be eligible to receive interim uncompensated care payments for FY 2022.

As stated in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (86 FR 45249), we allowed the public an additional period after the issuance of the final rule to review and submit comments on the accuracy of the list of mergers that we identified in the final rule. Based on the comments received during this additional period, we are updating this table to reflect the merger information received in response to the final rule and to revise the Factor 3 calculations for purposes of determining uncompensated care payments for the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. We are revising Factor 3 for all hospitals to reflect the updated merger information received in response to the final rule. We are also revising the amount of the total uncompensated care payment calculated for each DSH eligible hospital. The total uncompensated care payment that a hospital receives is used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments the hospital receives per discharge.

Start Printed Page 58022 accordingly, we have also revised these amounts for all DSH eligible hospitals. These corrections will be reflected in Table 18 and the Medicare DSH Supplemental Data File. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, these corrections to uncompensated care payments required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors as well as the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold. We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations.

In section IV.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we have made corresponding revisions to the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule to reflect the corrections discussed previously and to correct minor typographical errors. The files that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the corrections discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. In addition, we are correcting the inadvertent omission of the following 32 ICD-10-PCS codes describing percutaneous cardiovascular procedures involving one, two, three or four arteries from the GROUPER logic for MS-DRG 246 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents) and MS-DRG 248 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Non-Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents). ICD-10-PCS codeDescription02703Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02703ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02704Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02704ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C03Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C03ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02C04Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C04ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02713Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02713ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02714Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02714ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C13Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C13ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02C14Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C14ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02723Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02723ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02724Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02724ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C23Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C23ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02C24Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C24ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02733Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02733ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02734Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02734ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C33Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C33ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02C34Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C34ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.

We have corrected the ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual Version 39 and the ICD-10 MS-DRG GROUPER and MCE Version 39 Software to correctly reflect the inclusion of these codes in the arterial logic lists for MS-DRGs 246 and 248 for FY 2022. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking and Delay in Effective Date Under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), the agency is required to publish a notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register before the provisions of a rule take effect. Similarly, section 1871(b)(1) of the Act requires the Secretary to provide for notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register and provide a period of not less than 60 days for public comment.

In addition, section 553(d) of the APA, and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(i) of the Act mandate a 30-day delay in effective date after issuance or publication of a rule. Sections 553(b)(B) and 553(d)(3) of the APA provide for exceptions from the notice and comment and delay in effective date APA requirements. In cases in which these exceptions apply, sections 1871(b)(2)(C) and 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act provide exceptions from the notice and 60-day comment period and delay in effective date requirements of the Act as well. Section 553(b)(B) of the APA and section 1871(b)(2)(C) of the Act authorize an agency to dispense with normal rulemaking requirements for good cause if the agency makes a finding that the notice and comment process are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. In addition, both section 553(d)(3) of the APA and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act allow the agency to avoid the 30-day delay in effective date where such delay is contrary to the public interest and an agency includes a statement of support.

We believe that this final rule correction and correcting amendment does not constitute a rule that would be subject to the notice and comment or Start Printed Page 58023 delayed effective date requirements. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the preamble, regulations text, addendum, payment rates, tables, and appendices included or referenced in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, but does not make substantive changes to the policies or payment methodologies that were adopted in the final rule. As a result, this final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended to ensure that the information in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects the policies adopted in that document. In addition, even if this were a rule to which the notice and comment procedures and delayed effective date requirements applied, we find that there is good cause to waive such requirements. Undertaking further notice and comment procedures to incorporate the corrections in this document into the final rule or delaying the effective date would be contrary to the public interest because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies.

Furthermore, such procedures would be unnecessary, as we are not altering our payment methodologies or policies, but rather, we are simply implementing correctly the methodologies and policies that we previously proposed, requested comment on, and subsequently finalized. This final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended solely to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects these payment methodologies and policies. Therefore, we believe we have good cause to waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements. Moreover, even if these corrections were considered to be retroactive rulemaking, they would be authorized under section 1871(e)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, which permits the Secretary to issue a rule for the Medicare program with retroactive effect if the failure to do so would be contrary to the public interest. As we have explained previously, we believe it would be contrary to the public interest not to implement the corrections in this final rule correction and correcting amendment because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies.

IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), we are making the following corrections. A. Correction of Errors in the Preamble 1.

On page 44878, second column, last paragraph, line 10, “15 technologies” is corrected to read “technologies.” 2. On page 44889, lower two-thirds of the page, third column, partial paragraph, line 10, the procedure code “0DQ540ZZ” is corrected to read “0DQ54ZZ.” 3. On page 44960, in the untitled table, last 2 lines are corrected to read as follows. MDCMS-DRGMS-DRG title *         *         *         *         *         *         *08521Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with MCC.08522Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture without MCC. 4.

On page 45047. A. Second column, first full paragraph, lines 21 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”. B.

Third column, first full paragraph, line 28, the reference “section XXX” is corrected to read “section II.F.8.”. 5. On page 45048, second column, second full paragraph, lines 20 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”. 6.

On page 45049. A. Second column. (1) First full paragraph, line 12, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.8. Of the preamble of this final rule”.

(2) Second full paragraph, lines 1 and 2, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.7. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei) (pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 10.

On page 45158, third column, first partial paragraph, last line the phrase, “technology group 5).” is corrected to read “technology group 5) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. Y95 (Nosocomial condition) and one of the following. J14.0 (Pneumonia due to Hemophilus influenzae) J15.0 (Pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae), J15.1 (Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas), J15.5 (Pneumonia due to Escherichia coli), J15.6 (Pneumonia due to other Gram-negative bacteria), or J15.8 (Pneumonia due to other specified bacteria) for HABP and ICD10-PCS codes. XW033A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol antinfective into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) or XW043A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol anti-infective into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following.

B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] Start Printed Page 58024 [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei)(pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 11. On page 45291, middle of the page, the table titled “Table V.H-11. Previously Established and Newly Updated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-11—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8692470.887868MORT-30-HF #0.8823080.907773MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8402810.872976MORT-30-COPD #0.9164910.934002MORT-30-CABG #0.9694990.980319COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253960.018159♢  As discussed in section V.H.4.b. Of this final rule, we are finalizing the updates to the FY 2024 baseline periods for measures included in the Person and Community Engagement, Safety, and Efficiency and Cost Reduction domains to use CY 2019. Therefore, the performance standards displayed in this table for the Safety domain measures were calculated using CY 2019 data.* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 12. On page 45293, top of the page, the table titled “V.H-13 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-13—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8726240.889994MORT-30-HF #0.8839900.910344MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8414750.874425MORT-30-COPD #0.9151270.932236MORT-30-CABG #0.9701000.979775COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253320.017946* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 13. On page 45294, top of page, the table titled “V.H-14 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows. Table V.H-14—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8744260.890687MORT-30-HF #0.8859490.912874MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8433690.877097MORT-30-COPD #0.9146910.932157MORT-30-CABG #0.9705680.980473COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0240190.016873* Lower values represent better performance. Start Printed Page 58025#  Previously established performance standards.

14. On page 45312, second column, first full paragraph, lines 7 through 9, the phrase “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do match” is corrected to read “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do not match”. 15. On page 45386, third column, first full paragraph, line 12, the phrase “mellitus and who either” is corrected to read “mellitus, who”. 16.

On page 45400, top of the page, the table titled “Measures for the FY 2024 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, is corrected by— a. Correcting the title to read “Measures for the FY 2023 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”. B. Removing the heading “Claims and Electronic Data Measures” and the entry “Hybrid HWR**” (rows 20 and 21). C.

Following the table, lines 3 through 8, removing the second table note. 17. On page 45404, bottom of the page, after the table titled “Measures for the FY 2025 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, in the third note to the table, line 10, the parenthetical phrase “(July 1, 2023-June 30, 2023)” is corrected to read “(July 1, 2022-June 30, 2023)”. B. Correction of Errors in the Addendum 1.

On page 45532, bottom of the page, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors” is corrected to read as follows. Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality FactorsMS-DRG Reclassification and Recalibration Budget Neutrality Factor1.000107Wage Index Budget Neutrality Factor1.000715Reclassification Budget Neutrality Factor0.986741*Rural Floor Budget Neutrality Factor0.992868Rural Demonstration Budget Neutrality Factor0.999361Low Wage Index Hospital Policy Budget Neutrality Factor0.998029Transition Budget Neutrality Factor0.999859* The rural floor budget neutrality factor is applied to the national wage indexes while the rest of the budget neutrality adjustments are applied to the standardized amounts. 2. On page 45537, first column, first full paragraph, lines 4 through 10, the parenthetical phrase “(estimated capital outlier payments of $ 430,689,396 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,689,396 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,990,253)).” is corrected to read “(estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,964,386)).”. 3.

On page 45542, third column, last paragraph, lines 23 and 24, the figure “$5,326,356,951” is corrected to read “$5,326,379,560”. 4. On page 45543. A. Top of the page, first column, first partial paragraph.

(1) Line 1, the figure “$100,164,666,975” is corrected to read “$100,165,281,272”. (2) Line 17, the figure “$31,108” is corrected to read “$31,109”. B. Middle of the page, the untitled table is corrected to read as follows. €ƒOperating standardized amountsCapital Federal rate *National0.9490.947078* The adjustment factor for the capital Federal rate includes an adjustment to the estimated percentage of FY 2022 capital outlier payments for capital outlier reconciliation, as discussed previously and in section III.

A. 2 in the Addendum of this final rule. 5. On page 45545, the table titled “CHANGES FROM FY 2021 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS TO THE FY 2022 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58026 6.

On page 45553, second column, last paragraph, line 9, the figure “$472.60” is corrected to read “$472.59”. 7. On page 45554, top of the page, in the table titled “COMPARISON OF FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENTS. FY 2021 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE AND THE FY 2022 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE”, the list entry (row 5) is corrected to read as follows. Comparison of Factors and Adjustments.

FY 2021 Capital Federal Rate and the FY 2022 Capital Federal Rate FY 2021FY 2022ChangePercent change *         *         *         *         *         *         *Capital Federal Rate$466.21$472.591.01374  1.37 8. On page 45570. A. The table titled “TABLE 1A.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (67.6 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/32.4 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS GREATER THAN 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1A—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (67.6 Percent Labor Share/32.4 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index Is Greater Than 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$4,138.24$1,983.41$4,056.08$1,944.03$4,110.85$1,970.28$4,028.70$1,930.91 Start Printed Page 58027 b.

The table titled “TABLE 1B.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1B—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,720.07$2,280.04$3,770.30$2,310.83$3,694.96$2,264.65 9. On page 45571, the top of page. A. The table titled “Table 1C.—ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS FOR HOSPITALS IN PUERTO RICO, LABOR/NONLABOR (NATIONAL.

62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE BECAUSE WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1C—Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts for Hospitals in Puerto Rico, Labor/Nonlabor (National. 62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share Because Wage Index Is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022 Rates if wage index greater than 1Hospital is a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 2.0)Hospital is NOT a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 1.325)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor1  NationalNot ApplicableNot Applicable$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,770.30$2,310.831  For FY 2022, there are no CBSAs in Puerto Rico with a national wage index greater than 1. B. The table titled “TABLE 1D.—CAPITAL STANDARD FEDERAL PAYMENT RATE—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Table 1D—Capital Standard Federal Payment Rate—FY 2022 RateNational$472.59 C. Correction of Errors in the Appendices 1. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I.—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58028 Start Printed Page 58029 Start Printed Page 58030 2. On page 45579, third column, first paragraph, line 23, the figure “1.000712” is corrected to read “1.000715”.

Start Printed Page 58031 3. On page 45580, lower three-fourths of the page, first column, third full paragraph, line 6, the figure “0.986737” is corrected to read “0.986741”. 4. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II.—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments Per Discharge)” is corrected to read as follows. Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System[Payments per discharge] Number of hospitalsEstimated average FY 2021 payment per dischargeEstimated average FY 2022 payment per dischargeFY 2022 changes (1)(2)(3)(4)All Hospitals3,19513,10913,4482.6By Geographic Location:Urban hospitals2,45913,45413,8002.6Rural hospitals7369,90110,1782.8Bed Size (Urban):0-99 beds63410,72311,0112.7100-199 beds75411,01511,3052.6200-299 beds42712,25112,5512.4300-499 beds42113,49613,8472.6500 or more beds22316,56816,9922.6Bed Size (Rural):0-49 beds3118,5568,9214.350-99 beds2539,4199,6442.4100-149 beds949,78910,0332.5150-199 beds3910,51910,7882.6200 or more beds3911,46511,7842.8Urban by Region:New England11214,85815,2532.7Middle Atlantic30415,43215,8142.5East North Central38112,83813,1502.4West North Central16013,12113,4752.7South Atlantic40211,71012,0492.9East South Central14411,29011,5762.5West South Central36411,80612,0722.3Mountain17213,69814,0542.6Pacific37017,23017,6642.5Puerto Rico508,4918,6371.7Rural by Region:New England1913,99014,4633.4Middle Atlantic509,7369,9882.6East North Central11310,36110,5922.2West North Central8910,63810,9322.8South Atlantic1149,0329,3023East South Central1448,7328,9552.6West South Central1358,2928,5403Mountain4812,13412,3591.9Pacific2413,86514,5885.2By Payment Classification:Urban hospitals1,98312,67313,0032.6Rural areas1,21213,79614,1482.6Teaching Status:Nonteaching2,03110,67710,9632.7Fewer than 100 residents90712,38812,6942.5100 or more residents25718,93819,4372.6Urban DSH:Non-DSH50211,74912,0542.6100 or more beds1,22713,01513,3552.6Less than 100 beds3489,5599,8202.7Rural DSH:SCH26511,90612,2032.5RRC60814,38014,7472.6100 or more beds3012,11512,2981.5Less than 100 beds2157,7788,0253.2Urban teaching and DSH:Both teaching and DSH67914,11614,4832.6Teaching and no DSH7412,82513,1272.4No teaching and DSH89610,85011,1372.6No teaching and no DSH33410,82411,1102.6Special Hospital Types:Start Printed Page 58032RRC52314,47814,8592.6SCH30512,05312,3562.5MDH1539,1699,4042.6SCH and RRC15412,47512,7462.2MDH and RRC2710,62210,8532.2Type of Ownership:Voluntary1,88113,32113,6672.6Proprietary82811,47311,7692.6Government48614,10914,4662.5Medicare Utilization as a Percent of Inpatient Days:0-2564315,15815,5352.525-502,11012,92613,2682.650-6536710,77311,0102.2Over 65508,1328,4313.7FY 2022 Reclassifications by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board:All Reclassified Hospitals93413,59213,9442.6Non-Reclassified Hospitals2,26112,77213,1022.6Urban Hospitals Reclassified74914,26114,6192.5Urban Nonreclassified Hospitals1,72312,85113,1872.6Rural Hospitals Reclassified Full Year30010,08710,3412.5Rural Nonreclassified Hospitals Full Year4239,6109,9293.3All Section 401 Reclassified Hospitals53214,96815,3432.5Other Reclassified Hospitals (Section 1886(d)(8)(B))569,1499,4293.1 5.

On page 45584, bottom third of the page, third column, partial paragraph. A. Line 7, the figure “$151 million” is corrected to read “$158 million”. B. Line 10, the figure “$50 million” is corrected to read “$57 million”.

C. Lines 15 and 16, the phrase “for which we are approving new technology add-on payments” is corrected to read “for which we are approving or conditionally approving new technology add-on payments”. 6. On page 45585. A.

Top third of the page. (1) In the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 6 and 9 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impactPathway (QIDP, LPAD, or breakthrough device) *         *         *         *         *         *         *Fetroja (HABP/VABP)379$8,579.84$3,251,759.36QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         *Recarbrio (HABP/VABP)9289,576.518,887,001.28QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         * (2) Following the first untitled table, second column, partial paragraph, last line, the figure “$498 million” is corrected to read “$514 million”. B. Middle third of the page, in the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 2 and 4 are corrected to read as follows.

Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impact *         *         *         *         *         *         *Abecma484$272,675.00$131,974,700.00 Start Printed Page 58033*         *         *         *         *         *         *Tecartus15259,350.003,890,250.00 *         *         *         *         *         *         * 7. On pages 45587 and 45588, the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Model Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)—from FY 2021 to FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58034 Start Printed Page 58035 8. On page 45588, lower half of the page, beginning with the second column, first full paragraph, line 1 with the phrase “Rural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience” and ending in the third column last paragraph with the phrase “15.22 percent.

All” the paragraphs are corrected to read as follows. €œRural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience larger decreases in uncompensated care payments than their urban counterparts. Overall, rural hospitals are projected to receive a 17.28 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a greater decrease than the overall hospital average, while urban hospitals are projected to receive a 12.99 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, similar to the overall hospital average. By bed size, smaller rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decreases in uncompensated care payments. Rural hospitals with 0-99 beds are projected to receive an 18.97 percent payment decrease, and rural hospitals with 100-249 beds are projected to receive a 15.53 percent decrease.

In contrast, larger rural hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 14.16 percent payment decrease. Among urban hospitals, the smallest urban hospitals, those with 0-99 and 100-249 beds, are projected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments that is greater than the overall hospital average, at 15.49 and 15.50 percent, respectively. In contrast, the largest urban hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 12.02 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a smaller decrease than the overall hospital average. By region, rural hospitals are expected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments in all Regions, except for rural hospitals in New England, which are projected to receive a decrease of 1.27 percent in uncompensated care payments, and rural hospitals in the East South Central Region, which are projected to receive a smaller than average decrease of 13.01 percent. Regionally, urban hospitals are projected to receive a more varied range of payment changes.

Urban hospitals in the New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific Regions are projected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the South Atlantic, East North Central, West North Central, West South Central, and Mountain Regions, as well as hospitals in Puerto Rico are projected to receive smaller than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the East South Central Region are projected to receive an average decrease in uncompensated care payments. By payment classification, although hospitals in urban areas overall are expected to receive a 12.74 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, hospitals in large urban areas are expected to see a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 13.52 percent, while hospitals in other urban areas are expected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 11.21 percent. Rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decrease of 14.23 percent.

Nonteaching hospitals are projected to receive a payment decrease of 13.4 percent, teaching hospitals with fewer than 100 residents are projected to receive a payment decrease of 12.94 percent, and teaching hospitals with 100+ residents have a projected payment decrease of 13.39 percent. All of these decreases closely approximate the overall hospital average. Proprietary and voluntary hospitals are projected to receive smaller than average decreases of 11.56 and 12.61 percent respectively, while government hospitals are expected to receive a larger payment decrease of 15.21 percent. All”. 9.

On page 45589, first column, first partial paragraph, the phrase “hospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.79 and 32.81 percent, respectively.” is corrected to read as follows. €œhospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.85 and 32.86 percent, respectively.” Start Printed Page 58036 10. On page 45598, third column, last paragraph, lines 21 through 23, the sentence “The estimated percentage increase for both rural reclassified and nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” is corrected to read “The estimated percentage increase for rural reclassified hospitals is 1.3 percent, while the estimated percentage increase for rural nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” 11. On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “TABLE III.—COMPARISON OF TOTAL PAYMENTS PER CASE [FY 2021 PAYMENTS COMPARED TO FY 2022 PAYMENTS]” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58037 Start Printed Page 58038 12.

On page 45610. A. Second column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. (2) Line 11, the figure “$0.65” is corrected to read “$0.68”.

B. Third column, last full paragraph, last line, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. 13. On page 45611, the table titled “Table V—ACCOUNTING STATEMENT. CLASSIFICATION OF ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE IPPS FROM FY 2021 TO FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58039 CategoryTransfersAnnualized Monetized Transfers$2.316 billion.From Whom to WhomFederal Government to IPPS Medicare Providers. Start List of Subjects DiseasesHealth facilitiesMedicarePuerto RicoReporting and recordkeeping requirements End List of Subjects As noted in section II.B. Of the preamble, the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services is making the following correcting amendments to 42 CFR part 413. Start Part End Part Start Amendment Part1.

The authority citation for part 413 continues to read as follows. End Amendment Part Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 1302, 1395d(d), 1395f(b), 1395g, 1395l(a), (i), and (n), 1395x(v), 1395hh, 1395rr, 1395tt, and 1395ww. End Authority Start Amendment Part2. Amend § 413.24 by.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Parta. In paragraph (f)(5)(i) introductory text, removing the phrase “except as provided in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:” and adding in its place the phrase “except as provided in paragraphs (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( ii ) and (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:”. And End Amendment Part Start Amendment Partb. Revising paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A). End Amendment Part The revision reads as follows.

Adequate cost data and cost finding. * * * * * (f) * * * (5) * * * (i) * * * (A) Teaching hospitals. For teaching hospitals, the Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data. ( 1 ) Data format. For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must be in the new XML IRIS format.

( 2 ) Resident counts. ( i ) Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must contain the same total counts of direct GME FTE residents (unweighted and weighted) and IME FTE residents as the total counts of direct GME FTE and IME FTE residents reported in the provider's cost report. ( ii ) For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, and before October 1, 2022, the cost report is not rejected if the requirement in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( i ) of this section is not met. * * * * * Start Signature Karuna Seshasai, Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-P[FR Doc.

2021-22724 Filed 10-19-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-C.

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Can you buy amoxil online

A few weeks ago my fiance Caleb and I ordered a custom table for our new, rustic home that sits in the woods. I came across Ben Shea through some mutual friends and immediately fell in love with his work! After I saw the finished product of our table, I was definitely NOT disappointed. Ben is an awesome guy, so easy to work with and he totally made our vision become a reality! It’s exactly what I wanted. Raw, rustic, knots and grain. I’m.. obsessed. Ben is constantly creating lots of amazing wood pieces for homes, offices and gifts! Check out his Facebook fan-page HERE, his Etsy shop HERE, and his website HERE.

Meagan Nicole

 


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Can you buy amoxil online

This Sunday my mom and sister threw me a surprise bridal shower! I knew I was having the bridal shower, but I had absolutely nothing to do with the planning so I had no clue what to expect or who would be coming (although seeing random pieces of thrifted china and table clothes hidden around the house was getting me very excited!). It was more beautiful than I could’ve imaged and exactly what I hoped for. So many lovely faces came that I wasn’t expecting which made it all the sweeter. The theme was an outdoor garden party! My mom made her famous chicken salad recipe, a blueberry-raspberry-strawberry fruit medley, and greens with an olive oil lemon dressing (the one they use at Tomato Pie) YUM! The vintage dresser held two baskets- everyone brought their favorite kitchen spice or  cleaning item (which went in the awesome, wooden hamper my nana gifted us to the right of the dresser)! I loved the date night jar. Everyone wrote down date ideas on popcycle sticks for Caleb and I. We’ve been enjoying reading everyones recommendations.. especially the hilarious X-rated ones. haha!

If you’re wondering why my face looks so crazy in the opening-gifts photos it’s because we were playing the bubble gum game! Previously my sister had asked Caleb a bunch of random questions that he gave his answers to. While opening gifts, I was asked these questions as well and had to try and answer the same as Caleb did. For every question I got wrong I gad to put a piece of gum in my mouth. I actually did pretty good but still wound up with a few wads of gum, whoops. I never thought I could get tired of bubble gum until Sunday. HA! This was such a fun and exciting day! Huge thank you’s to my mom and sister for pulling it all together and getting so creative.. I know how much work and thought you put into everything to make it perfect for me and it means so much! To each and every lady that came to the party- you all made me feel so loved and blessed! Thank you for celebrating this time in my life; Caleb and I are beyond thankful for all of the amazing gifts and well wishes you showered us with. 🙂

*Beautiful cake by Wendy Hess at Oregon Dairy Bakery!

**All photographs taken by my amazing friend Rebekah of Rebekah Viola Photography! Thank you so much for capturing these memories for me.

Meagan Nicole


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